$1.5M grant supports testing laminated wood in seismic conditions

PULLMAN, Wash. — Washington State University researchers have received a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant to develop guidelines that will help builders use more sustainable timber in high-rise buildings in earthquake-prone areas.

Daniel Dolan, professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Washington State University is working in collaboration with the Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, University of Washington, Lehigh University, the University of Nevada at Reno, Forest Products Lab, and American Wood Council, to develop new designs for using cross-laminated timber (CLT) in buildings in seismic areas. The project is led by Shiling Pei at Colorado School of Mines. … » More …

Forest-powered biofuel flight heads to Washington, D.C.

SEATTLE – Washington state-based Alaska Airlines today made history flying the first commercial flight using the world’s first renewable, alternative jet fuel made from forest residuals, the limbs and branches that remain after the harvesting of managed forests.

The alternative jet fuel was produced through the efforts of the Washington State University-led Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA).  Read more…

PACCAR Environmental Technology Building dedicated

Building tours, a reception and music from the WSU Cougar Marching Band were part of the dedication of the new PACCAR Environmental Technology Building at Washington State University on Thursday, May 5. WSU Regents, industry supporters, students, faculty and staff attended.  Read more…

Creating Jobs Through Sustainable Building Technologies

Buildings stand among the nation’s leading producers of greenhouse gases. To blame is the energy used to operate them and the carbon-heavy materials required to construct them. With populations increasingly shifting toward urban centers, construction will only continue. Reducing emissions created by urban growth will require rethinking our built environment.  Read more…